Kyoto

End of coal in Ontario? Not if there’s a power crunch

January 14, 2014
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When electricity was restored to Toronto and elsewhere in Ontario after the ice storm of December 21, nobody cared where or how the current was generated and pushed through the wires to their house. All people cared about was getting their power back. Electricity is an utterly essential component in modern life. Conservation rhetoric notwithstanding,…

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Reducing carbon pollution from electric power generation: what works?

December 25, 2013
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Reducing carbon pollution from electric power generation: what works?

It has been more than sixteen years since the famous and infamous Kyoto Protocol. In signing Kyoto, 37 countries and the EU committed to reducing emissions of man-made carbon dioxide (CO2), the principal greenhouse gas pollutant. In those sixteen years, many countries, especially Germany, took the Protocol seriously—so seriously that they led efforts to reduce…

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Power, fear, and carbon in Japan: the Iron Rule of Power Generation II

December 19, 2013
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Power, fear, and carbon in Japan: the Iron Rule of Power Generation II

On March 11 2011, a 14-meter-high tsunami, triggered by an earthquake of unimaginable power, smashed the northeast coast of Japan. The tsunami killed about 20,000 people pretty much immediately. Watch any video of this catastrophe and you will see why. The wave also knocked out the backup power to a nuclear plant. As a result,…

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Ontario grid expansion, 1960s: why developing countries will decarbonize electricity using nuclear energy

November 28, 2013
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The developing world, i.e. the world outside Europe, North America, and Russia, is now responsible for nearly three-quarters of the anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) going into the earth’s atmosphere. The central question for climate change policy is: how can this group of countries, which is much larger and more populous than the developed world, continue…

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Fighting carbon in Ontario: a stunning reversal of the 1997 carbon spike

October 31, 2013
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Ontario’s carbon reductions from electric power generation have since 2003 been simply remarkable. From a peak of over 40 million metric tons of CO2 in the year 2000, these fell to just over 16 million tons in 2012. That represents a 24 million ton annual reduction. This is by any standard a stunning achievement, worthy…

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Item 1: if Ontario did not have its nuclear generating fleet, last hour’s CO2 emissions would have been AT LEAST:

6,394 metric tons, and the CIPK would have been 379.2 grams

Item 2: Since prorogation of the Ontario legislature on October 15, 2012, provincial gas-fired generating plants have dumped this much CO2 into our air:

14,457,404 metric tons. This is a running total. Every hour, the total increases by the amount of Gas CO2 given in Table 1.

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