Air quality

Electrifying transportation: easy policy, local politics

March 26, 2014
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Electrifying transportation: easy policy, local politics

Like politics, all environmentalism is local. It’s the actions you take as you go about your day that determine the balance in your own personal carbon account with Mother Earth. Fortunately, it is actually very easy, thanks to actions taken by other people years ago, to live extremely cleanly. Here’s how. The cleanest way you…

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End of coal in Ontario? Not if there’s a power crunch

January 14, 2014
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When electricity was restored to Toronto and elsewhere in Ontario after the ice storm of December 21, nobody cared where or how the current was generated and pushed through the wires to their house. All people cared about was getting their power back. Electricity is an utterly essential component in modern life. Conservation rhetoric notwithstanding,…

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Power, fear, and carbon in Japan: the Iron Rule of Power Generation II

December 19, 2013
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Power, fear, and carbon in Japan: the Iron Rule of Power Generation II

On March 11 2011, a 14-meter-high tsunami, triggered by an earthquake of unimaginable power, smashed the northeast coast of Japan. The tsunami killed about 20,000 people pretty much immediately. Watch any video of this catastrophe and you will see why. The wave also knocked out the backup power to a nuclear plant. As a result,…

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Electricity prices in the EU, a tale of four countries: the price of political correctness II

December 17, 2013
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Electricity prices in the EU, a tale of four countries: the price of political correctness II

Denmark and Germany have the highest household electricity prices in the OECD. France and Finland have prices that are in the lower 17 of the OECD’s 34 countries. It wasn’t always that way. As you can see in the chart and table below—both based on recently published OECD data—Denmark, Germany, and France had very similar…

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Germany and the Iron Rule of Power Generation: when nuclear goes down, carbon goes up

December 17, 2013
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Germany and the Iron Rule of Power Generation: when nuclear goes down, carbon goes up

In electric power generation in developed countries, when one form of steady, large-scale, reliable generation comes out of the system, another with the same attributes must go in to replace it. If the first form steadily puts, say, 1,000 megawatts into the grid, hour after hour, day after day, then the form that replaces it…

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Item 1: if Ontario did not have its nuclear generating fleet, last hour’s CO2 emissions would have been AT LEAST:

6,167 metric tons, and the CIPK would have been 376.8 grams

Item 2: Since prorogation of the Ontario legislature on October 15, 2012, provincial gas-fired generating plants have dumped this much CO2 into our air:

14,398,286 metric tons. This is a running total. Every hour, the total increases by the amount of Gas CO2 given in Table 1.

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Should molybdenum-99, a vitally important medical isotope that is produced most efficiently in nuclear fission reactors, become more expensive?

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