The Energiewende blues: where have Germany’s good times gone

Yesterday green energy was such an easy game to play. But now the numbers are rollin’ in and green looks more like gray. Guess your propaganda needs tonin’ down… cause you’re soundin’ like a Greenpeace clown

Because it’s Friday, here is the original:

Okay, that’s as much cheeseball Kinks reworking as you’re getting out of me. But somebody has to point out the size of the German green energy failure. Some are trumpeting this failure as a success. They are not telling the truth.

Two years ago I predicted Germany’s grid electricity CIPK would reach 500 grams by 2014.

Greenpeace advising Germany to tell Japan how to reduce power sector GHGs is like Bernie Madoff advising Goldman Sachs to tell AIG to be financially responsible.

Here is a table showing German grid electricity generation by fuel type for the first half of 2014, and the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions that came with each fuel type. I got the kWh data from a Scott Madden report.

billion kWh % cipk, grams CO2, kT
Nuclear 51.1 17 0.000 0
Brown coal 80.6 27 900.000 72,540
Hard coal 57.8 19 800.000 46,240
Natural gas 18.3 6 500.000 9,150
Wind 29 10 0.000 0
Solar 22.7 8 0.000 0
Biomass 30.5 10 700.000 21,350
Hydro 11.3 4 0.000 0
TOTAL 301.3     149,280
      CIPK, grams 495

As you can see, German grid electricity came with a CIPK of 495 grams through the first half of 2014. That is enough to fill a standard 159.9-litre oil barrel more than one and a half times.

Greenpeace, through one of the innumerable inane press releases in which it specializes, recently “advised” German Chancellor Angela Merkel that “Japan’s nuclear policy will not deliver on climate targets.” (I really need to embed laugh tracks for these statements.)

Japan’s electricity sector GHGs have gone through the roof since that country’s panic shutdown of the 98 percent of Japanese reactors that were unaffected by the March 2011 tsunami. This is why Japan has abandoned its Kyoto (!!!) targets—see article.

Greenpeace advising Germany to tell Japan how to reduce power sector GHGs is like Bernie Madoff advising Goldman Sachs to tell AIG to be financially responsible.

3 comments for “The Energiewende blues: where have Germany’s good times gone

  1. James Greenidge
    March 7, 2015 at 12:57

    “Greenpeace, through one of the innumerable inane press releases in which it specializes, recently “advised” German Chancellor Angela Merkel that “Japan’s nuclear policy will not deliver on climate targets.” (I really need to embed laugh tracks for these statements.)”

    GREAT piece! My sole lament is WHY isn’t someone in the mass media taking this on so it’d do some good???

    James Greenidge
    Queens NY

  2. ChrisB
    March 8, 2015 at 11:56

    Have to admit that I burst out laughing at the Madoff quip, & was promptly stifled when I glanced at the top left ppm box. These are serious issues.

    When multiple parties have strong differences of opinion, counseling of some type is in order. It’s often easier to move forward after someone admits to being in the wrong and is willing to change behaviors. In this case Germany is on a self-destructive binge. We can try to leave Merkel & company *an out*, so they can *save face* so to speak. But presently they seem intent to dig themselves deeper. All we can do is set the better example, & be prepared to fast-track any assistance Germany may need – once they come to their senses.

    We’ll soon find out if Japan is still in denial or is ready to set an example for Germany. Are the other G-20 nations ready to assist Nippon to a low-carbon, healthy, 21st century economy though? There is a fable about a bundle of sticks….

  3. Tim
    April 6, 2015 at 22:36

    It looks their is already a pretty nasty fight going on Southern Germany especially Bavaria over constructing transmission to bring down renewable power from Northern Germany.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/25/world/europe/germans-balk-at-plan-for-wind-power-lines.html?_r=0

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