Newly focused Areva turns up the heat on AECL with Canadian design review

Areva might have lost its battle with EDF over supremacy in the French nuclear industry, but it hasn’t lost its desire to sell reactors in Canada. A CNSC official just confirmed to me that Areva will submit its 1,000 megawatt Atmea PWR to CNSC for a Vendor Pre-Project Design Review. A pre-project review, which will cost Areva something in the neighborhood of $3 million, signals to New Brunswick that Areva is pitching a serious product—the province and Areva signed a letter of intent last summer to build a clean energy park.

This news should make for an interesting panel discussion at the Canadian Nuclear Association’s conference in Ottawa tomorrow. Jacques Besnainou, Areva North America CEO, will be on the panel, along with Tom Mitchell of Ontario Power Generation (which selected AECL’s ACR as the design of choice for OPG’s Darlington B project) and Blair Kennedy of NB Power.

On Friday, Tim Hudak, the leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservative Party, will address the conference. Hudak has been all over the news lately, criticizing Ontario premier Dalton McGuinty’s Long Term Energy Plan. Hudak’s own critics point out that he has yet to release his own energy plan. Will he give any hints in Ottawa on Friday?

3 comments for “Newly focused Areva turns up the heat on AECL with Canadian design review

  1. Ted Gruetzner
    February 24, 2011 at 14:36

    Note:
    OPG has not selected a technology for the new Darlington reactors.

    Tom Mitchell of Ontario Power Generation (which selected AECL’s ACR as the design of choice for OPG’s Darlington B project) and Blair Kennedy of NB Power.

    • Steve Aplin
      February 24, 2011 at 14:49

      Ted, thanks — I referred to the first Darl. B go-round back in mid-2009, when the bid review committee said AECL’s bid was the only compliant one and others on the review committee referred to AECL as the preferred vendor. Of course no design was actually selected and AECL’s offer expired last year so it’s all back at the drawing board.

      And given Duguid’s comments lately, I guess it’s not outside the realm of possibility that Ontario could revisit the whole RFP process.

  2. May 1, 2011 at 07:29

    Hi Steve
    Only $3M in the US it’s more like $50M or am I missing something?

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